Saturday, December 5, 2009

Works in Progress (Picture Heavy)

Burda Jacket, ready for lining insertion...
Here is the inside of the front, the front yoke is pulled open so you can see the seams.
The wool and interfacing is a little bulky, and I wanted my seams to lay flat, so I pressed them open and catch-stitched them down.
I've never made sleeve heads before, but these really do help pull the cap flat nicely. The shoulder pads are the thinnest available, 1/4" I think...
The end of the sleeve have inside facings since the slit allows you to wear them down, or turn them up. I had to re-read the instructions a few times to figure out the stitching!
Now, for the big decision! Leave the snaps uncovered (pewter color, the 2 on top) or color with the lining (the 1 below)??? Yes, they are the world's largest snaps, and Ann new exactly where to find them, at Pacific Trims in NYC! I'll probably wear the jacket open more than closed, so they will be visible.
Here are the shoulder yokes, which really give this jacket it's unique appearance. I wish I could get them to be a little thinner and lay flatter. Ideas???
I'm close on this one, but the silk dress needs to be done for Saturday night, so the jacket will wait for a few days.

Vogue 8382 dress, ready for cutting and construction...
(don't you love my "pattern weights", aka Yankee Candles and pantry cans!)
The silk is beautiful, but nearly a chiffon. You can see below that when held up to the light, it's nearly sheer (that's my countertop under the fabric). So, I did a little research (back issues of Threads) and found a recent article by Kenneth King about interlining/underlining. He recommends silk organza to add support and weight to the lightest fabrics. I had 2 yards of sand/nude silk organza in the stash, but no black. With no time for a trip to the fabric store (Haberman's is 45 minutes away, you know that Joann's organza is polyester), I grabbed it and it worked perfectly.
The added bonus with this color organza is that I was able to use my carbon paper and tracing wheel to transfer all the darts and grain lines easily. By basting it to the silk, the 2 together will now behave like a single layer of heavier fabric (good-bye "indecent exposure"), and I can stitch right on the darts marks!

You might not be able to see the transfer markings above, but you can definitely see that my hand-stitching. I stayed inside the seam allowances all the way around, and used a single length of embroidery thread, since the silks are both so fine and to keep the stitching smooth.

I had to place the pattern pieces closely and carefully to make best use of the color change in the fabric. I don't want a noticeable black/purple line at the empire seam! I also made 2 pattern alterations: I raised the "cleavage notch" (all the reviewers said and showed it was really revealing) and added a 1/4" to the s.a. at the waist, just to be safe on the fit, since I'll be sitting most of the night. The lining was much, much easier to cut since it's just black Ambiance. The bodice lining will finish the neckline and sleeve hem, I'm so thankful I don't have to deal with facings!

Hope you're all staying warm. We got our first really cold winter night and woke up to a dusting of snow yesterday. I heard that Texas and Louisiana got more snow than we did, so hopefully that forced you indoors and made for a fun sewing day!

19 comments:

Nancy K said...

To get a seam flatter you would apply lots of steam and then hold it flat with a clapper until it's dry/cool. Apply pressure on the clapper. You can either have a separate wooden clapper or the bottom of a wooden point presser is also a clapper. In a pinch a child's wooden block will work. You also want to do this against a harder surface if it is not co-operating. Secondly, you can do this when you press seam open, but you'd want to put brown paper or an envelope under the seam allowances so that they don't show through. The other thing in a seam like this with multiple layers is to grade the layers.
It is looking fabulous, the seam not withstanding! Are those the colored plastic snaps? I bought some at Bottani Buttons for a sweater coat I was making. I've since change the pattern, and need buttons instead. A well, such is life.

Kristine said...

Thanks for the tips, Nancy. Steam and pressure... got it. As for the snaps, they are metal, a dark silver/pewter finish.

Dana said...

Wow, you've got two gorgeous projects going on!

I say definitely cover the snaps. For the shoulder yokes, well you may not want to hear this, but I'd consider making the underside out of lining. Your sleeve head is so perfect though! Try what Nancy K said first.

Cindy said...

Hey, I have the same paper weights! This was a very helpful post. I learned so much!

Sew Shy said...

Both your projects look like they're going to be absolute stunners!

Andrea said...

I have been hearting this jacket for quite some time. Since I'm not a petite either, I've been thinking about lengthening the jacket, and then I came across your posts. Thank you so much for all of your wealth of information. The jacket is now on my list for sure. I can't wait to see your Vogue dress finished. That fabric is beautiful.

Summerset said...

Everything is looking so good! Can't wait to see that jacket finished - it is gorgeous.

KID, MD said...

These are both going to be AMAZING when you finish.

Patty said...

I like the covered snaps best, just my humble opinion :-) And I can't wait to see the dress finished, I LOVE that fabric!

Amanda S. said...

Gorgeous!!! I missed that last post showing your fabric choice, but it is to-die-for! LOVE it!!! Too bad I have no where to wear such a beautiful fabric, I would copy in a heartbeat. I can't wait to see everything all made up! Oh, and I kind of like the contrast of the metal showing on your jacket. They aren't too far off the gray color, but just a bit to add some interest.

Bunny said...

These are two gorgeous projects you have going. You can actually hammer your seams with a hammer if nothing else works. Just make sure your fabric is covered with a cloth. Steam then then bang away. As usual, try a sample first, but I have used this technique more than you know. That dress will be a stunner.

Kathi said...

Wow, you are ambitious with your current projects!! Can't wait to see the finished projects! You have come so far with the jacket - it is amazing!!

Gorgeous Things said...

That Burda is fabulous! I was with Phyllis today and she was wearing her rendition of this jacket. It's fabulous, as is yours! This design is finicky about the lay of the fabric. I almost wonder if it would work better cut on a bias grain.

I would use a dauber/clapper on the seam, and make sure to put a piece of cardboard or even a strip of brown paper between the SA and the outer side to prevent show through. The snaps are great. Both projects are going to be faboo!

Gorgeous Things said...

PS - the covered ones, definitely

JoanneM said...

Love the color of the fabric. You know I love blacks and charcoal......covered buttons for sure. The jacket looks amazing. A clapper was the only thing I did not come home with from sit and sew in August -so next year it is!!! I need a clapper!

amber said...

I can't wait to see the finished version of this dress - it is looking like it's going to be a real stunner!

Lindsay T said...

Excellent progress on all fronts, my dear! You've definitely moved yourself up several notches in terms of your sewing skills!

I bought a bolt of silk organza from Dharma Trading. Very reasonable, now that we know we need to use it so much.

Amanda S. said...

Hi, Kristine, I hope I didn't come across as complaining about Gorgeous Fabrics. I love that site, and Anne has always given me excellent service. I'm glad you got a big cut of your silk - it is such a beautiful fabric. :)

okie2thfairy said...

I made this jacket too and you're doing a fabulous job so far. I like the covered snaps personally. It makes a huge difference in the fabric selection with this jacket. Yours looks much more polished. I'm heading back to the ironing board with mine. Can't wait to see the finished products.